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HEX REFERENCING & PUNCTUATION STYLE GUIDE

Before you send an article or other written submission to Hex we ask that you ensure your material conforms to our referencing and punctation style guide as best as you are able. Here are examples of the format HEX uses for endnotes and bibliography, as well as a guide to Hex’s punctuation formatting guidelines.
Please note that Hex does not use footnotes.

If your submission includes endnotes then you do not need to also include a bibliography.

If you do not find the type of source you are using in these lists, just give us as much information as you have.

ENDNOTES – FIRST REFERENCE FROM A SOURCE:

Please note endnotes in the text with a number only. This style has been chosen because we feel it is the least intrusive, while still being informative, to the reader.

BASIC FORMAT FOR A BOOK
Author name, Title (City: Publisher, Year) Page #.

1. Jane Tompkins, West of Everything: The Inner Life of Westerners (New York: Oxford UP, 1992) 22.

TWO OR THREE AUTHORS
2. Barbara Rico and Sandra Mano, American Mosaic: Multicultural Readings in Context (Boston: Houghton, 1991) 121.

FOUR OR MORE AUTHORS
3. Martin J. Medhurst et al., Cold War Rhetoric: Strategy, Metaphor, and Ideology (New York: Greenwood, 1990) 52.

EDITORS
4. Rololf Anaya and Francisco Lomei, eds., Aztlan: Essays on the Chicano Homeland (Albuquerque: Academia-El Norte, 1989) 65.

TRANSLATION
5. Umberto Eco, Foucault’s Pendulum, trans. William Weaver (San Diego: Harcourt, 1989) 234.

UNKNOWN AUTHOR
6. The Times Atlas of the World, 9th ed. (New York: Times, 1992) 135.

EDITION OTHER THAN THE FIRST
7. Erika Lindemann, A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers, 2nd ed. (New York: Oxford UP, 1987) 23.

MULTI-VOLUME WORK
8. Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, and Essays, vol. 2 (New York: Library of America, 1992) 98.

ENCYCLOPEDIA OR DICTIONARY
9. “Croatia,” The New Encyclopedia Britannica: Micropedia, 1991.

WORK IN AN ANTHOLOGY
10. J. M. Synge, “On an Anniversary,” The New Oxford Book of Irish Verse, ed. Thomas Kinsella (Oxford: Oxford UP, 1986) 318.

ARTICLE IN A MONTHLY MAGAZINE
11. John Lukacs, “The End of the Twentieth Century,” Harpers’s Jan. 1993: 41.

ARTICLE IN A JOURNAL PAGINATED BY VOLUME
12. Gabriel Segal, “Seeing What Is Not There,” Philosophical Review 98 (1989): 200.

ARTICLE IN A JOURNAL PAGINATED BY ISSUE
13. G. J. Johnson, “A Distinctiveness Model of Serial Learning,” Psychological Review 98.2 (1991): 208.

ARTICLE IN A DAILY NEWSPAPER
14. Lena H. Sun, “Chinese Feel the Strain of a New Society,” Washington Post 13 June 1991: A1.

UNSIGNED ARTICLE IN A NEWSPAPER OR MAGAZINE
15. “Radiation in Russia,” U.S. News and World Report 9 Aug. 1993: 41.

PAMPHLET
16. United States, Dept. of the Interior, Natl. Park Service, Ford’s Theatre and the House Where Lincoln Died (Washington: GPO, 1989) 1.

PERSONAL INTERVIEW
17. Patricia Harrison, personal interview, 19 Feb. 1993.

PUBLISHED INTERVIEW
18. Anna Quindlen, interview, Commonweal 14 Feb. 1992: 10.

FILM OR VIDEOTAPE
19. Through the Wire, videotape, dir. Nina Rosenblum, narr. Susan Sarandon, Fox/Lorber Home Video, 1990 (77min.)

TELEVISION OR RADIO PROGRAM
20. “This Old Pyramid,” with Mark Lehner and Roger Hopkins, Nova, PBS, WGBH, Boston, 4 Aug. 1993.

RECORD, TAPE, OR CD
21. Giuseppe Verdi, Falstaff, with Tio Gobbi, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Nan Merriman, and Fedora Barbieri, cond. Herbert von Karajan, Philharmonia Orch. and Chorus, EMI, 7 49668 2, 1988.

WEBSITE
22. Celia W. Dugger, “Supermarket Giants Crush Central American Farmers,” New York Times December 28, 2004, www.organicconsumers.org/corp/walmartca122804.cfm

SUBSEQUENT REFERENCES TO A SOURCE:

You need to only give enough info. that the reader can identify the referred to work. For example:

23. Tomkins 85.

24. Rico and Mano 23.

25. Times Atlas 99.

Or for more than one work by one author, use a shortened title:

26. Gordon, Good 135.

27. Gordon, Other 34.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY/ REFERENCES:

BASIC FORMAT FOR A BOOK
Author name, Title (City: Publisher, Year).

Jane Tompkins, West of Everything: The Inner Life of Westerners (New York: Oxford UP, 1992).

TWO OR THREE AUTHORS
Barbara Rico and Sandra Mano, American Mosaic: Multicultural Readings in Context (Boston: Houghton, 1991).

FOUR OR MORE AUTHORS
Martin J. Medhurst et al., Cold War Rhetoric: Strategy, Metaphor, and Ideology (New York: Greenwood, 1990).

EDITORS
Rololf Anaya and Francisco Lomei, eds., Aztlan: Essays on the Chicano Homeland (Albuquerque: Academia-El Norte, 1989).

TRANSLATION
Umberto Eco, Foucault’s Pendulum, trans. William Weaver (San Diego: Harcourt, 1989).

UNKNOWN AUTHOR
The Times Atlas of the World, 9th ed. (New York: Times, 1992).

EDITION OTHER THAN THE FIRST
Erika Lindemann, A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers, 2nd ed. (New York: Oxford UP, 1987).

MULTI-VOLUME WORK
Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, and Essays, vol. 2 (New York: Library of America, 1992).

ENCYCLOPEDIA OR DICTIONARY
“Croatia,” The New Encyclopedia Britannica: Micropedia, 1991.

WORK IN AN ANTHOLOGY
J. M. Synge, “On an Anniversary,” The New Oxford Book of Irish Verse, ed. Thomas Kinsella (Oxford: Oxford UP, 1986).

ARTICLE IN A MONTHLY MAGAZINE
John Lukacs, “The End of the Twentieth Century,” Harpers’s Jan. 1993.

ARTICLE IN A JOURNAL PAGINATED BY VOLUME
Gabriel Segal, “Seeing What Is Not There,” Philosophical Review 98 (1989).

ARTICLE IN A JOURNAL PAGINATED BY ISSUE
G. J. Johnson, “A Distinctiveness Model of Serial Learning,” Psychological Review 98.2 (1991).

ARTICLE IN A DAILY NEWSPAPER
Lena H. Sun, “Chinese Feel the Strain of a New Society,” Washington Post 13 June 1991.

UNSIGNED ARTICLE IN A NEWSPAPER OR MAGAZINE
“Radiation in Russia,” U.S. News and World Report 9 Aug. 1993.

PAMPHLET
United States, Dept. of the Interior, Natl. Park Service, Ford’s Theatre and the House Where Lincoln Died (Washington: GPO, 1989).

PERSONAL INTERVIEW
Patricia Harrison, personal interview, 19 Feb. 1993.

PUBLISHED INTERVIEW
Anna Quindlen, interview, Commonweal 14 Feb. 1992.

FILM OR VIDEOTAPE
Through the Wire, videotape, dir. Nina Rosenblum, narr. Susan Sarandon, Fox/Lorber Home Video, 1990 (77min.)

TELEVISION OR RADIO PROGRAM
“This Old Pyramid,” with Mark Lehner and Roger Hopkins, Nova, PBS, WGBH, Boston, 4 Aug. 1993.

RECORD, TAPE, OR CD
Giuseppe Verdi, Falstaff, with Tio Gobbi, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Nan Merriman, and Fedora Barbieri, cond. Herbert von Karajan, Philharmonia Orch. and Chorus, EMI, 7 49668 2, 1988.

WEBSITE
Celia W. Dugger, “Supermarket Giants Crush Central American Farmers,” New York Times December 28, 2004, www.organicconsumers.org/corp/walmartca122804.cfm

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PROPER PUNCTUATION AND STYLE FOR HEX:

Here is a helpful guide for these and other punctuation questions. The suggested keystrokes are for Mac computers; PC Word users can find the appropriate symbols through the insert>symbol drop-down menu.

Apostrophes and Quotation Marks

Use ‘ for regular use = it’s (on the keyboard along with “).

Please use ‘true’ (“ ”) quotes, not ‘straight’ quotes, when quoting! ( ” ).
Straight quotes are only for indicating “inches.”

Use ‘ & ’ for each side of a phrase or term = ‘word’ (alt + ] for left, ‘alt + shift + ]’ for right).

Use “ & ” for quoting someone = she said, “What she said.” (alt + [ for left, alt + shift + [ for right).

Please Note: ALWAYS put periods and commas INSIDE the quotes. All other punctuation (question marks, exclamation marks, etc.) go inside or out depending on whether they are part of the quote.

For example: She said,“Do it like this.” I was like, “No way!”

DO NOT use quotes for book titles; use italics instead. DO use true quotes for article titles.

Italics and Underlines

Use italics for all titles = Hex Magazine.
Use italics also for emphasis not underlines = We do not use underlines in Hex.

Capitalization in Titles or Subheadings

Do not capitalize little words within titles such as: a, an, the, but, as, if, and, or, nor—or prepositions, regardless of their length.
For example: The Lord of the Rings.

Dashes

Hyphen: use – to hyphenate words = Pennsylvania-German (on the keyboard along with – [en dash]).
En dash: use – to show a number span = 3–5 trolls ( alt + - ).
Em dash: use — to put a space between ideas in sentence = I am thinking this—and also this ( alt + shift + - ).

Please DO NOT use I am thinking this– and this.
OR I am thinking this– and this.
OR anything else.

The Hex style is to use an em dash to separate ideas in a scholarly article; in an informal article it is acceptable to separate ideas like this – and then continue on. (Using space+en dash+space).

Ellipsis

Usewith no space between words. [ alt + ; ].

Please do not use … dot dot dot.

Commas

Always use a comma in a series.

For example: I am talking about this, this, and this.

Not: I am talking about this, this and this.

Unless you are saying…I like bananas, peanut butter and jelly, and raw milk.

Spacing

DO NOT use double spaces between sentences. Only ONE space is necessary.

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